student testingAssessments are an important way for students, parents, teachers and school administrators to track whether students are gaining the knowledge, skills and attributes they will need for success beyond high school. Having clearly defined learning targets that are assessed provides parents and teachers with the information they need to help students be successful, and provide individualized help if students need it. Assessments are important, but parents should also consider student grades, student growth and other information for a more complete picture of student learning. 

Purpose
The Idaho English Language Assessment (IELA) is designed to assess the proficiency level of Limited English Proficient (LEP) students in the five areas of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and comprehension. The primary purpose of this assessment is to provide Idaho educators with proficiency scores for use in their schools, districts, and state, as mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

Students Tested
All students who have been identified as Limited English Proficient (LEP) within the district and schools will take the IELA. An LEP student is an English language learner specifically identified for a language development program. Not all English language learners are LEP students; for example, a student may not have been placed in an LEP program or may have already exited the program.

Structure and Format
The Idaho English Language Assessment is divided into four subtests:

Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking. Each student will be tested annually in all four areas.

IELA scores are used to determine when a student possesses sufficient English language proficiency to exit the LEP program.  The scores are also used to determine the effectiveness of the district’s educational program for LEP students.

Purpose
The purpose of the Idaho Standard Achievement Test (ISAT) is to accurately describe student achievement and growth of student learning as part of program evaluation and the school, district, and the state accountability system; provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of students' progress toward, and attainment of the knowledge and skills required to be college- and career-ready; and capitalize on the strengths of computer adaptive testing-efficient and precise measurement across the full range of achievement with quick turnaround of results.

Students Tested
The ISAT tests are administered to students in grades 3-11 to provide ongoing monitoring of individual, school, district, and state progress. One component of the ISAT required for high school graduation is the 10th grade assessment in English Language Arts / Literacy and Mathematics. Proficiency on the 10th grade ISAT verifies that an Idaho student has met Idaho Core Standards in these content areas.

Structure and Format
The ISAT consists of two parts: a computer adaptive test and performance tasks taken on a computer. The ISAT is composed of English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics tests for grades 3-11 that address the Idaho Core Standards and Science tests for grades 5, 7, and 10 that address the Idaho Science Standards. A variety of item types are used to assess what a student knows and what they can do with that knowledge. The items address a variety of skill levels, from short-term recall of facts to skills and problem solving.

Purpose
The Idaho Reading Initiative, enacted by the Idaho Legislature, was designed to ensure that all children in the State of Idaho will master the skills they need to become successful readers. The purpose of the Idaho assessment is to indicate which children are most likely going to be at risk of failure with skills that are prerequisite for being successful readers throughout life. As is written in the statute, the state K-3 assessment test results shall be reviewed by school personnel for the purpose of providing necessary interventions to sustain or improve the students' reading skills.

Students Tested
Idaho Statute 33-1614 requires K-3 students in Idaho to be assessed as they develop critical reading skills. All District 91 students K-3 are tested in the fall, winter and spring.

Structure and Format
The IRI is a 10-minute indicator administered to an individual student by a trained test administrator. The tests are grade specific and get progressively more challenging throughout the school year. All students are scored on a 3 point scale. A 3 is at grade level; 2 is near grade level; 1 is below grade level.

Purpose
The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) is a standardized test administered by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation that assesses reading, writing and math. If the student takes the test in the 11th grade, the scores from the PSAT/NMSQT are used to determine eligibility and qualification for the National Merit Scholarship Program. The scores are also good indicators of how the student will perform on college entrance exams such as the SAT.

Students Tested
All District 91 students are given the opportunity to take the PSAT free of charge in the fall of their sophomore year. The test is not required for graduation but is given as a benefit to the students to assess their college readiness.

Structure and Format
The PSAT measures performance in reading, writing and math. The test consists of 5 sections. The two 25-minute reading sections include reading passages and sentence completion. The one 30-minute writing section includes multiple-choice questions on identifying errors and improving grammar and usage. The two 25-minute math sections include questions on arithmetic, algebra and geometry. The total test time is 2 hours and 10 minutes. The PSAT has a possible score of 240. Qualifying scores for the National Merit Scholarship vary from year to year.

College and Career Readiness Benchmarks
The PSAT/NMSQT College and Career Readiness Benchmarks are the scores that students should meet or exceed to be considered on track to be college ready. The methodology for calculating the PSAT/NMSQT benchmarks mirrors the calculation of the SAT benchmarks. The current benchmarks are the 10th- or 11th-grade PSAT/NMSQT scores that predict, with a 65 percent probability, a first year college grade point average of 2.67 or higher.

Learn more about PSAT